My List

Remove All Share Selected

Message from Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner

Greetings! I am Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner. Our City has a great history and story to tell. Helping to showcase this history are the City's many historic districts. As a potential homebuyer, if you are looking for a historic home and neighborhood the Houston Association of Realtors can help out with a 'homefinder' tool at www.har.com. The website features all the residential properties, including new construction listed for sale, in the City's historic districts. HAR and the City of Houston collaborated to produce this tool. HAR.com is the first Multiple Listing Service in the nation to provide this service! Once you arrive at har.com, click the 'Find a Home' link. Next, you will find an option for 'Historic Districts' under the 'Select a Property Type' heading. From there, you will be able to explore listings of homes for sale in the city's designated historic districts. There will also be links to information on the City's Historic Preservation Ordinance, historic tax exemptions and individually designated historic landmarks outside the boundaries of Historic Districts.



List of Historic Districts

District
Descripition
Audubon Place is part of the original Montrose Addition, which was platted in 1911 with beautiful esplanades along Lovett, Montrose, Yoakum and Audubon Place Boulevards. Some of Houston's most prominent citizens built homes on and adjacent to Audubon Place Boulevard in the architectural styles in vogue at the time - Bungalow, Prairie, Mission Revival, Colonial Revival, Queen Anne, Cape Cod, and Art Deco as well as Craftsman, the most prevalent style. Audubon Place Historic District was designated in 2009. For more information, please go to See more detail.
Avondale, developed in the early 20th century, was home to many of Houston's early business and social leaders before the development of River Oaks and Broadacres. The neighborhood was designed with special attention paid to quality of life, with wide streets, cement curbs and gutters, and utility poles located in rear alleys. The historic homes of Avondale are representative of the architectural styles in vogue in that time period, such as Prairie, American Four Square, Craftsman, and Tudor Revival. Architects and builders who built homes in Avondale included Fred Marett, E. L. Crain, and most prominently, the Russell Brown Company, which was responsible for more than a dozen of the homes built during Avondale's initial development. The historic district is in two sections - the East was designated in 1999, the West in 2007. For more information, please go to: See more detail.
Avondale, developed in the early 20th century, was home to many of Houston's early business and social leaders before the development of River Oaks and Broadacres. The neighborhood was designed with special attention paid to quality of life, with wide streets, cement curbs and gutters, and utility poles located in rear alleys. The historic homes of Avondale are representative of the architectural styles in vogue in that time period, such as Prairie, American Four Square, Craftsman, and Tudor Revival. Architects and builders who built homes in Avondale included Fred Marett, E. L. Crain, and most prominently, the Russell Brown Company, which was responsible for more than a dozen of the homes built during Avondale's initial development. The historic district is in two sections - the East was designated in 1999, the West in 2007. For more information, please go to: See more detail.
Boulevard Oaks is much-admired for its lovely esplanades lined with giant oak trees along North and South Boulevards. The neighborhood contains an eclectic collection of two-story brick homes built in the 1920s and 30s, and designed by the city's finest architects and builders of the day, such as Joseph Northrop, Jr., Katharine Mott, Hiram Salisbury, Joseph Finger, and Russell Brown. The styles of architecture found in Boulevard Oaks reflect the Revival styles in vogue at the time, especially Tudor Revival and Colonial Revival, as well as French Manorial, Neoclassical, and English Picturesque. Boulevard Oaks Historic District was designated in 2009, and is also listed in the National Register of Historic Places. For more information, please go to: See more detail.
Broadacres, established in 1923, is notable for its park-like setting with elegant homes set back on large, lushly landscaped lots. William Ward Watkin laid out the neighborhood's master plan of curvilinear streets and esplanades lined with large live oaks. Most of Broadacres' 26 homes were designed by leading architects of the day, such as Birdsall Briscoe and John Staub. Broadacres Historic District was designated in 2007, and the neighborhood is also listed in the National Register of Historic Places. For more information, please go to: See more detail.
Courtland Place, established as an exclusive neighborhood in 1906, is a gated, one-block long, tree-lined boulevard that has been home to some of Houston's most prominent families. Courtland Place's gracious mansions were designed in the popular architectural styles of the period Georgian, Colonial, and Tudor Revival, as well as Mediterranean and Prairie styles. All eighteen original homes, built between 1907 and 1937, are still standing, giving the street a unique early 20th century character. Courtlandt Place is the city's first historic district, designated in 1996, and is also listed in the National Register of Historic Places.. For more information about City of Houston historic districts and landmarks, please go to: See more detail.
First Montrose Commons First Montrose Commons is bounded by Richmond Ave. to the south,Roseland to the west,West Alabama Street to the north,and Southwest Freeway Spur 527 to the east. The majority of homes in the district are early 20th century Craftsman style,one and two story single family residences. For more information about City of Houston historic districts and landmarks, please go to: See more detail.
Freeland, only two blocks in size, was platted in 1920, from a portion of the original 1839 homestead of Gabriel Gostick. The developers of Freeland knew that proximity to the flourishing Houston Heights community would attract buyers to Freeland and could benefit Freeland residents as well. Freeland features an intact concentration of one-story 1920s bungalows, giving this modest neighborhood near Houston Heights an early 20th century ambiance. Freeland Historic District was designated in 2008. For more information about City of Houston historic districts and landmarks, please go to: See more detail.
Germantown, also called the Grota Homestead neighborhood, is northwest of downtown Houston and was first platted for residential development in the 1890's. The subdivision is just north of Downtown Houston, bounded by Houston Avenue on the west, I-45/North Freeway on the east and Woodland Park on the south. Historical documents found in archives revealed that it was originally surveyed and deeded in the 1830's as 'Germantown'. The area contains a significant collection of bungalows and modest houses with Queen Anne and Colonial Revival detailing. A handful of larger houses face Woodland Park. For more information about City of Houston historic districts and landmarks, please go to: See more detail.
Glenbrook Valley is located in southeast Houston and outside Loop 610 and is roughly bounded by Sims Bayou to the north, Glenloch and Hollygrove Drives to the west, Wynlea and Wilmerdean Streets to the south, and Glencrest Street to the east. Glenbrook Valley was developed beginning in 1953 and is the first post-World War II neighborhood in Texas to receive historic district designation. The neighborhood primarily consists of American Ranch Style and Mid-Century Modern homes. For more information about City of Houston historic districts and landmarks, please go to: See more detail.
The High First Ward Historic District is located in Houston's historic First Ward. Today, the term 'First Ward' has come to refer to the area bounded by Washington Avenue to the south, I-10 to the north, I-45 to the east and Sawyer Street to the west. For more information about City of Houston historic districts and landmarks, please go to: See more detail.
Houston Heights established in 1891 and named for its elevation 23 feet above that of downtown Houston, was one of the earliest planned communities in Texas. It flourished as a distinct municipality until 1918 when it was annexed to the City of Houston. Despite rapid redevelopment in the 20th century, Houston Heights still maintains the feel of a small town with its historic Victorian and bungalow-style homes. Also found in Houston Heights are historic churches, theatres, corner stores, parks, fraternal halls, schools, a library, and a business district on W. 19th Street. Houston Heights Historic Districts East and West, designated in 2008 and 2007 respectively, cover a large portion of the original Houston Heights plat, making them the largest historic district in the city. The neighborhood boasts many homes listed in the National Register of Historic Places. For more information about City of Houston historic districts and landmarks, please go to: See more detail.
Houston Heights South is located within the larger Houston Heights neighborhood and is bounded by 11th Street to the north, Heights Boulevard to the west, 4th Street to the south and Oxford Street to the east. The neighborhood contains predominantly small 19th century, one-story cottages and larger, two-story Victorian-era homes, and numerous early 20th century bungalow style buildings. The neighborhood also contains a large number of buildings that have been individually listed in the National Register of Historic Places. For more information about City of Houston historic districts and landmarks, please go to: See more detail.
Houston Heights established in 1891 and named for its elevation 23 feet above that of downtown Houston, was one of the earliest planned communities in Texas. It flourished as a distinct municipality until 1918 when it was annexed to the City of Houston. Despite rapid redevelopment in the 20th century, Houston Heights still maintains the feel of a small town with its historic Victorian and bungalow-style homes. Also found in Houston Heights are historic churches, theatres, corner stores, parks, fraternal halls, schools, a library, and a business district on W. 19th Street. Houston Heights Historic Districts East and West, designated in 2008 and 2007 respectively, cover a large portion of the original Houston Heights plat, making them the largest historic district in the city. The neighborhood boasts many homes listed in the National Register of Historic Places. For more information about City of Houston historic districts and landmarks, please go to: See more detail.
Main Street Market Square Historic District contains Houston's best concentration of late 19th and early 20th century commercial buildings. Approximately half of the district's historic structures were built before 1900. Also located within the district are Allen's Landing and Market Square two of the most historic sites in Houston. The buildings in Main Street Market Square range from modest mid-19th century brick commercial buildings to a number of small but ornately detailed High Victorian commercial buildings and include a fine selection of multi-story public bank and office buildings. Main Street Market Square became a City of Houston historic district in 1997 and is also listed in the National Register of Historic Places. For more information about City of Houston historic districts and landmarks, please go to: See more detail.
Norhill Historic District was developed in the 1920s by Will Hogg, the developer of River Oaks, as a 'master planned community' for the working man's rich in artistic bungalows. In contrast to River Oaks, Norhill's modest homes, built by local contractors, were constructed from designs found mostly in plan books and catalogs popular during that period. Norhill's most distinctive feature is the park-like esplanades that divide Norhill Boulevard. Designated in 2000, Norhill Historic District is one of the city's largest historic districts. For more information about City of Houston historic districts and landmarks, please go to: See more detail.
The Old Sixth Ward, designated as a city historic district in 1998, contains the highest intact concentration of Victorian-era buildings in Houston. Located just northwest of downtown, the neighborhood retains the feel of a modest, self-contained area with its 19th century and early 20th century homes, corner stores, churches, school, and former fire station. In 2007, most of the Old Sixth Ward was designated by the City as a Protected Historic District. The neighborhood is also listed in the National Register of Historic Places. For more information about City of Houston historic districts and landmarks, please go to: See more detail.
Shadow Lawn is one of several elegant enclave neighborhoods found in Houston's Museum District. Developed in 1923 by Houston attorney and judge, John H. Crooker, Shadow Lawn contains 14 distinguished homes built along a curving tree-lined street. Some of the best architects of the day designed homes in Shadow Lawn, including Joseph W. Northrop, Jr., William Ward Watkin, John F. Staub, Maurice J. Sullivan, Cameron D. Fairchild, Vance D. Phenix, Hiram A. Salisbury, Lee W. Lindsay, Anderson Todd, and Howard Barnstone. Shadow Lawn Historic District was created in 2008. For more information about City of Houston historic districts and landmarks, please go to: See more detail.
The Starkweather Historic District is within the Independence Heights community, just north of the North Loop segment of Interstate 610. The district is located on East 31 1/2 Street between Yale Street and Cortlandt Street. Starkweather derived its name from F. W. Starkweather, who originally subdivided the land that is now East 31 1/2 Street. For more information about City of Houston historic districts and landmarks, please go to: See more detail.
West Eleventh Place is a small, private, residential cul-de-sac located off Bissonnet Street in Houston's Museum District. Developed as a 'private place' neighborhood in 1920 by architect Joseph W. Northrop, Jr., the district contains architect-designed houses along a narrow private lane landscaped with street trees characteristic of 1920s Houston - magnolias, palms, and live oaks. The entrance to the neighborhood is defined by its original brick and stone gate piers. West Eleventh Place Historic District was created in 1997, and is also listed in the National Register of Historic Places. For more information about City of Houston historic districts and landmarks, please go to: See more detail.
Established in 1902, Westmoreland Historic District contains some of the grandest residential architecture to be found in Houston in an eclectic mixture of Late Victorian and early 20th century house styles. Despite the intrusion of a freeway along the east side of the district and replacement of some original houses with post-war apartment complexes, Westmoreland retains its unique historic character. Westmoreland Historic District was designated as a city historic district in 1997, and most of the neighborhood is also listed in the National Register of Historic Places. For more information about City of Houston historic districts and landmarks, please go to: See more detail.
Woodland Heights is located two miles north of downtown Houston and is roughly bounded by Omar Street to the north, Julian Street to the west, Euclid Street to the south and Morrison Street to the east. The neighborhood contains many one and two-story houses and cottages primarily in the bungalow, craftsman, Queen Ann and late Victorian styles. For more information about City of Houston historic districts and landmarks, please go to: See more detail.







Neighborhood Site Map

Search Neighborhood Search Golf Courses Search Local Happenings Search Cities Search Zip Code Search Counties Search Real Estate Markets Search Highrises Search Master Planned Communities Search Senior Living Communities Search Houston Historic Districts Search Neighborhood Videos Houston Area Real Estate Areas