6 Factors That Determin Your Mortgage Rate

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The interest rate attached to your home loan will not only affect your monthly mortgage payment, it will also affect the amount of interest you end up paying over the life of the loan. Therefore, it is essential that you do everything you can to get the best rate possible. Below is a list of six factors that can determine the mortgage interest rate you receive.

  • Credit score - This the most important factor. The higher your scores, the less risk to the lender. Most lenders consider good scores between 700 to 749, while an excellent credit score is anything over 750. This does not mean you cannot purchase a home with lower credit scores, because you can.
  • Down payment - The larger your down payment, the lower your interest rate should be. Again, less risk. However, a large down payment is not required to purchase a home. You can purchase a home with no down payment or as little as 3.5% down.
  • Property location - Are you buying your home in an urban or rural area?
  • Loan type - VA, conventional, FHA or USDA, your loan type does affect your interest rate.
  • Loan term - Duration of your loan. Shorter term loans generally get lower interest rate, hence, 15 years vs. 30 years.
  • Interest rate type - Fixed or adjustable? Your initial interest rate may be lower with an adjustable-rate loan, however, it may increase later down the road.

Buying a home does have a lot of moving pieces and getting all the pieces to fit is most important, so that you can take comfort, knowing that all the right decisions were made for your benefit. And your benefit alone. Understanding interest rate and how it is determine is an important part of the process because it involves saving you money. You are the best part of what I do. Thank you for being here. Until next time...Diana

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Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this blog are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the HRIS.
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